The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Jan 23, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Rings




Rings (PG-13)
Film Reviews by Amy Diaz

02/09/17
By Amy Diaz adiaz@hippopress.com



Rings (PG-13)

The videotape of doom and its accompanying creepy-girl ghost returns in Rings, yet another movie from the early 2000s getting a 2017 franchise sequel.
You watch the tape and seven days later you die — that and the long-haired ghoul-girl are kind of all I remember from The Ring. This movie later also reminds us of the loophole: copy the VHS of creepy Samara and her curio of spooky images and make someone else watch it and then they, not you, will die comically, I mean horribly.
The central action of this movie starts when Professor Gabriel Brown (Johnny Galecki), a character who seems like he’s going to be important but turns out not to be, decides to buy a VCR at a flea market. There’s no good reason for him to buy this VCR or to watch the tape labeled “watch me” that’s stuck inside. But, I guess if he just threw it and the VCR away, like a normal person would, we won’t have a movie. So he watches it, it happens to be the spooky death movie and thus begins a kind of experiment, wherein he gets his students to watch the tape (now a digital video file) and then has them make a copy and get other people to watch it so they’ll cheat Samara-death. 
Again, no good reason for this (there’s some talk about it proving the existence of the soul, but even the movie doesn’t waste a lot of time fleshing that out) but the “experiment” angle allows student Holt (Alex Roe) and then his girlfriend Julia (Matilda Lutz) to be infected with videotape-itis. But when Julia makes a copy, she gets the director’s cut, with bonus scenes involving a church and birds and other random stuff. She decides to do further investigation into the images and into Samara — the little girl who was creepy in life and then generated the deadly chain letter video after she was murdered. 
This movie is strangely earnest and seems as though it is unaware of the nearly two decades of movies that have come between the first U.S. version of The Ring and now (years where quite a few horror movies riffed on The Ring’s general look and tone). It still treats the idea of a creepy thing coming out of an unplugged TV as a shocker and doesn’t add anything new to either the story’s basic premise or how it works in the present. The movie also doesn’t deviate from its playing-it-down-the-center serious tone, but has just enough strangeness about it (everything about Johnny Galecki’s performance, for example) that there are moments (though not nearly enough) of unintentional comedy. Rings is, ultimately, just kinda goofy. C-
Rated PG-13 for violence/terror, thematic elements, some sexuality and brief drug material. Directed by F. Javier Gutierrez and a screenplay by David Loucka and Jacob Estes and Akiva Goldsman, Rings is an hour and 42 minutes long and distributed by Paramount Pictures. 





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu