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Jan 21, 2018







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Riverside, The New National Anthem (Greenleaf Music)




Chastity Belt, I Used To Spend So Much Time Alone (Sub Pop Records)

It’s been hard not to love these four girls, what with their Monkees-style videos done on the cheap and their throwback-Sears-catalog photo shoots. Their aim is to help rep the current echo-renaissance in Seattle, and toward that end they work themselves up into a (bored) frenzy of Pixies-ish riffage played by surf and Cure-style guitars, with drummer Gretchen Grimm doing a 1980s MTV beginner thing. Time to Go Home, their 2015 second LP, wrought the anti-anthem “Cool Slut,” a celebration of the unworkable urge to go topless and things of that nature, whatever, but it was a touchdown for singer Julia Shapiro, who cemented a position between Florence Welch and Aimee Mann, both regal and damaged simultaneously. This new LP is more serious, exploring the lonely darkness a bit, resulting in things both catchy (“Different Now”) and off-putting (“Caught in a Lie,” which features Grimm again pulling the change-of-speed trick she’s done before). It’s not always a fun listen, but it’s deep, as much as that might count — think your average episode of Girls. A- — Eric W. Saeger




Riverside, The New National Anthem (Greenleaf Music)
CD Reviews: 6/29/17

06/29/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Riverside, The New National Anthem (Greenleaf Music)

Second album from this jazz quartet, which features trumpeter Dave Douglas, sax guy Chet Doxas and bass player Steve Swallow, reportedly the life partner of Carla Bley for the past 40 years, from whom three of these compositions originated. She claims that these interpretations saved them from the dustbin more or less, and these guys indeed do an admirable job of pounding out the title track, “King Korn” and “Enormous Tots,” all three of which fit in with the Douglas stuff that makes up all but one of the remaining songs. With every passage this record aims to revisit New York’s free jazz era of the 1960s, which translates to a boppy, near-beatnik aura, with lots of discordant but pattern-matched freestyling. There’s nothing that would disturb the customers at a musty $9 cappuccino tourist trap, which is where it would best fit in, though it’d certainly take the edge off a particularly boring day. B+ 





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