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Jan 21, 2018







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Panthers fans show their true colors. Photo courtesy of Lauren Byers.




A few big-city teams

Memorial High School Crusaders
Where they play: Chabot/McDonough Field, 1 Crusader Way, Manchester
Admission: $3
At the concession stand: Have a slice of pizza ($2) or hot chocolate and a candy bar ($2) 
 
Manchester West High School Blue Knights
Where they play: 9 Notre Dame Ave., Manchester
Admission: $3 adults, $2 senior citizens
At the concession stand: Enjoy some chips and cheese ($2) or a soda and popcorn ($2) 
 
Concord High School Crimson Tide
Where they play: Memorial Field, 70 S. Fruit St., Concord
Admission: $3 adults, $2 non-CHS students
At the concession stand: Friends of Performing Arts stand offers a variety of snacks
 
Nashua High School South Purple Panthers
Where they play: Stellos Stadium, 7 Stadium Dr., Nashua
Admission: $5 adults, $3 students
At the concession stand: Dudley’s Concessions offers a variety of snacks




Root for the home team
Good food and good fun at high school football games

10/16/14
By Allie Ginwala aginwala@hippopress.com



Grab a blanket and maybe your old letterman jacket and head over to the local high school football field for an inexpensive afternoon or evening of live sports, snacks and community.

Most high schools only charge a few dollars for admission, and with it you usually get to see a marching band, cheerleaders and, of course, a quality football game.
“High school football in New Hampshire is very good, very exciting,” said Peter Colcord, head football coach for the Manchester Memorial High School. “We have a lot of wide open offenses and lots of scoring,” making it a fun time for spectators. 
Adding to the intensity of the game, he said, is New Hampshire’s small-state status, which makes for a lot of natural rivalries between teams. But rather than causing problems, those rivalries tend to bring communities together. 
Vance Sullivan, varsity head football coach for Manchester West High School, said that high school sports have a unique way of bringing out the best in a town — and in the players.
“The biggest part is not the score…[it’s] watching young boys transform into young men,” Sullivan said. “They play … and understand pressure and learn to deal with it. It’s an eye-opening experience for people to see and watch them deal.” 
Just as the spectators pay attention to the players, the  players pay attention to the crowds.
“The kids notice when people come,” Colcord said. “It shows [them] that the community is behind them. … It makes a difference when we have a big crowd; they feel [the] support.”
One of the best parts for Eric Brown, head football coach at Concord High School, is the atmosphere that surrounds the game. 
“It’s great at Memorial Field,” he said. “We have a bunch of soccer fields [and] on a Friday night you have all kinds of kids running around — fun for all ages.”
If you got change back from your $5 when you got to the field, head to the concession stand for some cheap treats. Most high school teams sell snacks and even “real” foods like pizza or hot dogs. Proceeds often go toward school programs, so there’s a good chance you’re supporting your community’s schools or athletic programs when you buy that candy bar.
 
As seen in the October 16, 2014 issue of the Hippo. 





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