The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Sep 21, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Skirts by Katy Solsky. Courtesy photo.




Submissions

March Marché is full, but Solsky is looking for submissions for the Concord and Manchester arts markets this summer. Submissions and guidelines are available at granitestateartsmarket.com. Solsky has a “loosely selective” process, and most artists rotate in the amount of times they show.
 
Attend March Marche
Where: True Brew Barista, 3 Bicentennial Square, Concord
When: Saturdays, March 7 through March 28, 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.
Admission: Free
Visit: granitestateartsmarkets.com




Signs of spring
March Marché starts out the arts market season

03/05/15
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



Katy Solsky is speeding up the start of the arts market season with March Marché (“market” in French), an indoor market at True Brew Barista happening every Saturday through the end of  the month.

From 9:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m., March 7 through March 28, visitors will meet with about a dozen artists who’ve been hard at work all winter making jewelry, handbags, upcycled furniture, clothing and fine art. Some are familiar faces who will be previewing items they’ll show this summer, while others are brand new to the scene.
“We’ve all got cabin fever, quite frankly,” Solsky said during a phone interview. 
Solsky is the force behind the Granite State Arts Markets, which have occurred across the state, from Concord to Dover to Claremont.
Concord in particular has drawn a devoted regular crowd. It occurs in Bicentennial Square just outside True Brew Barista and will return this year from May until October.
“We have such a nice synergy with True Brew. They’re right on the square where we set up the normal market. We thought we’d make the magic happen indoors this time,” Solsky said. “Stephanie [Zinser, True Brew owner] is the one who actually asked about doing something inside a couple years ago. We’ve kind of been mulling it over. I think it was a good time to do it this year.”
In January, she was still uncertain; artists were exhausted from the holiday market season, but the crummy weather is what “sealed the deal.” 
Vendors, Solsky said, were “absolutely delighted” at the prospect of starting their selling season early.
Sara Petipas, a potter from Loudon, was pleased at the prospect of participating in March Marché because she loves the summer event so much. She’ll be at True Brew on March 7 and on March 28.
“It’s a great Saturday morning activity in a beautiful location,” Petipas said. “It’s more of a casual space, unlike a craft fair, where load-in is at 8 a.m. and you’re there till 5. … It’s definitely less stressful, and the location is fabulous.”
Jane Eslinger, who makes whimsical, enamelled metal jewelry from recycled copper, was equally pleased to hear about the inception of March Marché. She was more than ready for market season to start; in fact, at the time of the phone interview, she was filling out craft and arts fair applications.
“I was absolutely thrilled. [Solsky] is an organizer and an arts promoter and a vendor. She’s got a great perspective. She knew right off the cuff that doing something like this in March would be something all of us could get behind. It’s a great way to fuse the coffee shop and the arts market, and to get people to anticipate the summer market.”
Solsky says it’s kind of like being the first person at the market. 
“You definitely get to see what they’ve got stockpiling that’s new. So that will be exciting,” Solsky said.
Solsky started up the regular markets because she felt there was a void in the New Hampshire arts scene during the summer, and there’s a similar lack of artistic vendor opportunities in the spring.
“My goal has always been to create a venue for artists,” Solsky said. “I would always prefer to compliment the other events going on, rather than compete with them. … I think we inhabit the space between a traditional craft fair and a League of New Hampshire Craftsmen fair.”
Solsky says her small committee is “loosely selective.”
“We do have some League members, but we also have people who are starting out. … We also definitely have people who like to do upcycling,” Solsky said. 
 
As seen in the March 5, 2015 issue of the Hippo.





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu