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Jul 15, 2018







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Asparagus with poached eggs. Reprinted with permission from the publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt from The Farmstead Egg Guide and Cookbook by Terry Golson. Photography by Ben Fink. Copyright 2014.




Book signing and talk with Terry Golson

When: Saturday, March 22, from 2 to 3 p.m.
Where: Toadstool Bookshop, 586 Nashua St., Milford
Visit: hencam.com, Golson’s website, for a live feed of her own chickens




Something to cluck about
Author shares tips on backyard chickens and fresh eggs

03/20/14



 Who hasn’t driven by a roadside sign reading “Fresh Eggs” in rural (or even suburban) New Hampshire? Backyard chicken coops are on the rise, and so are farm-fresh eggs.

“There is a huge uptick,” author, chef and hen-owner Terry Golson said during a recent phone interview. “Chickens fit within a farm ecosystem so well. They’re portable, you can move them from place to place, they make use of areas that crops can’t necessarily be grown on. In New Hampshire, where you have so many old barns, you can put chickens in without much retrofitting.”
Golson is the author of cookbooks like 1,000 Lowfat Recipes, Wholehearted Cooking, the children’s book Tillie Lays an Egg and the recently released The Farmstead Egg Guide & Cookbook. Golson released her first egg-based cookbook in 2006, but her new book is a cookbook as well as a guide to keeping backyard chickens — or just enjoying farm-fresh eggs in case you can’t keep chickens of your own.
“I was kind of ahead of the curve as far as backyard chickens go,” Golson said about her first book. “Now that backyard chickens are so widely popular, Houghton [Mifflin Harcourt] picked it up again.”
Golson has 19 chickens of her own, as well as two goats, a rabbit named Phoebe, two dogs and a horse named Tonka (who doesn’t live in Golson’s backyard, but is stabled just up the road). It may sound like a farm, but Golson doesn’t live in a rural area. She lives in a suburban neighborhood outside Boston.
“I do joke that chickens are the gateway drug to farm animals,” she said. “It might be that you have a small lot in a suburban neighborhood, that all you can keep is chickens, but if you happen to have two acres — watch out.”
Golson will be visiting the Toadstool Bookshop in Milford on Saturday, March 22, for a book signing and discussion on her new book and on the pros and cons of keeping chickens.
“I’m going to talk about why the eggs from our backyard chickens are so much better than anything we can get in the supermarket,” Golson said. “When I do a recipe that has seasonings in it, the egg doesn’t disappear. It’s still an important part of the recipe. I find that supermarket eggs just hold things together.”
Factors like how far the egg has to travel, how the chickens are treated and what they’re eating all come into play. 
“A variety of vegetables, being outdoors, grass and bugs and running around — that comes through into the eggs,” she said. “The freshness difference is huge. … Find someone that has chickens in their backyard, in their fields. If there’s a sign on the side of the road that says ‘Fresh Eggs,’ then pull in.” 
 
As seen in the March 20, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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