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Jan 23, 2018







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Participating food trucks 

Boogalows Island BBQ (Jamaican cuisine) 
Hot Potato Food Truck (fries, poutine, barbecue smoked meat, chicken wings) 
The Kitchen Restaurant Group (tacos) 
The Soup Guy (gluten-free and vegan soups and chili) 
Todd’s Street Side Grille (wraps, burgers, french fries, etc.) 
Vagabond Coffee Car (coffee, teas, fresh-pressed juices) 
 
1st Annual Nashua Food Truck Festival
When: Saturday, Oct. 15, open to the general public from 5 to 6 p.m. 
Where: Upper parking lot of R.J. Finlay & Co., 30 Temple St., Nashua 
Cost: Tickets to access the festival before the general public are sold out, but admission for the general public after 5 p.m. is free. 
Visit: iugonashua.com




Street eats
Nashua gets its own food truck festival

10/13/16
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 Nashua is celebrating the food truck trend for the first time this year with a festival dedicated to food on wheels. The first annual Nashua Food Truck Festival is happening Saturday, Oct. 15, in the upper parking lot of R.J. Finlay & Co. on Temple Street. 

“There [have] been a few conversations in previous years about doing something like this, but it never came to fruition,” said Michael Aquino, chairman for the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce Young Professional group, also known as iUGO Nashua, which is organizing the event. “So we decided to take it on and get something off the ground and see how much interest there was, and there’s been a lot of interest.” 
There will be six food trucks featured at the festival, selling a variety of fare like poutine, barbecue, tacos, Jamaican cuisine, coffee and tea, vegan soups and more. Five of the trucks are coming from the New Hampshire seacoast area, and one is coming from Maine. There aren’t many food trucks currently based in the greater Nashua area, but Aquino said he’s hoping the festival will change that. 
“We have a decent restaurant scene in downtown, and we aren’t as big as other cities, so there’s not many [food trucks] that travel around here day to day trying to sell food,” he said, “but I think we’re going to start to see it more. I know some local people looking to get into the food truck scene, and hopefully [the festival] paves the way for more of that kind of thing around here.” 
Aquino said the response so far has been overwhelming; tickets to access the festival before it opens to the general public — 400 were available — have already sold out, and there’s been interest from more food trucks than the festival space can accommodate. iUGO is already looking into larger venues and additional vendors for next year’s festival. 
As to the reason behind the growing popularity of food truck festivals, Aquino has a theory. 
“A lot of these trucks specialize in what they serve, and I think people are attracted to that specialty food experience,” he said. “In any community, all you have are the same restaurants, so what better way to try a bunch of new things you don’t have access to throughout the year?” 





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