The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Apr 22, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Stuck in a part-time job?
Underemployment stats say you’re not alone

04/13/17
By Ryan Lessard news@hippopress.com



 A new study published by the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey School of Public Policy found that the rate of people working part-time jobs (defined as 35 hours per week or less) when they’d rather be working full-time has not returned to pre-recession levels nationwide, and statistics for the Granite State show the same scenario playing out. In fact, people stuck in part-time jobs in the state outnumber unemployed workers.

 
Nationwide numbers
Rebecca Glauber is an associate professor of sociology at UNH and the author of the recent study, which found that the number of so-called involuntary part-time workers rose sharply as a result of the Great Recession to a height of 9 million in 2010 nationwide. 
She wanted to investigate some of the less-publicized measures of recovery that might tell a different story than the rosier unemployment rate. 
“If we want to think about economic recovery since the Great Recession, we need to look beyond the unemployment rate,” Glauber said.
At its peak, involuntary part-time employment for women reached 8 percent in 2009, and 6.4 percent for men in 2010. 
By 2015, while the unemployment rate had returned to pre-recession levels, involuntary part-time employment had not.
Before the recession, in 2006, the involuntary part-time rates were 3.6 for women and 2.4 for men. By 2015, it was still as high as 5.3 percent for women and 4.1 percent for men.
Glauber said she’s not sure if this is the new normal, but if recovery trends continue at this pace, the involuntary part-time employment rate might return to pre-recession levels by late 2018.
In the meantime, though, people are struggling.
“It’s a real economic problem for real people and their families,” Glauber said. 
Glauber said part-time workers are more than five times more likely to be living in poverty.
 
Local employment
The numbers are similar in New Hampshire, according to the involuntary part-time employment rate from New Hampshire Employment Security for the period between 2000 and 2016. 
In 2006, the rate was 2.1 percent, which it had adhered closely to since 2001. 
It reached a peak of 4.9 percent in 2010 and had lowered to 2.8 percent by 2016.
While the national trend has been fewer involuntary part-time workers than unemployed workers, the last three years in New Hampshire has seen the inverse of that, meaning more people in the state were underemployed for economic reasons than were unemployed. 
In 2014, the unemployment rate in the state was 4.2 percent while the rate of people stuck working part-time was 4.5 percent. 
Similarly, unemployment went down to 3.4 percent in 2015 while involuntary part-time was still at 3.8 percent.
The rates of unemployment and involuntary part-time in 2016 were both 2.8 percent, but estimates from NHES show there are about 800 more people stuck in part-time jobs than there are unemployed people. 
Meanwhile, unemployed people outnumber involuntary part-time workers nationwide by 1.8 million, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu