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Surrogacy made easier
State’s first surrogacy matchmaking firm has opened

07/27/17
By Ryan Lessard news@hippopress.com



 A change in state law that has made the gestational surrogacy process simpler has prompted a local agency to start offering matchmaking and legal services.

James Bianco is a New Hampshire adoption attorney who founded Avenues to Surrogacy and helped craft the new surrogacy law in 2014. He said the old law resulted in too much uncertainty.
“New Hampshire has had a surrogacy law for a number of years, but it was somewhat ineffective in that we found that people were very nervous with the existing laws,” Bianco said.
The problem, Bianco said, was that potential surrogates feared being responsible for the child if the intended parents backed out or if there were any health issues with the infant. And the intended parents feared the surrogate might decide the keep the child as her own.
“Nobody was comfortable with that, because it was unsure,” Bianco said.
He said the new law fixes that uncertainty by requiring a petition be filed with the court by the second trimester that affirms the child belongs to the intended parents. This avoids the protracted court battles that could ensue if a party decided to change their mind.
“We think it’s a step forward. We think that it balances all the rights of all the parties, and it’s fair. And a court gets to approve it, so it’s not just an agreement between the parties,” Bianco said.
He said the law was not modeled after any other state laws and is unique at least on the East Coast.
Kristine Pries, the director of the agency, said Bianco had been offering legal services over recent years through Bianco Professional Association, but couples still needed help getting matched with surrogates.
“We found that there was no agency here in New Hampshire to help make those matches,” Pries said.
Only gestational surrogacy is allowed in the state, which involves an embryo from the intended parents. That way, the carriers are not genetically related to the babies.
Surrogates earn anywhere from $15,000 to $25,000 per pregnancy depending on factors like how many times they’ve carried in the past and whether they are willing to carry twins.
The agency interviews prospective surrogates to find out what they are willing to do, whether they can be local and whether they are open to having two embryos implanted for twins.
Based on profiles created for parents and surrogates, the agency pairs them up and sets up meetings either in person or on Skype to see if they hit it off. 





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