The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Oct 21, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Tablets for inmates
Corrections department launches digital device program

05/31/18



By Ryan Lessard
news@hippopress.com
 
More than 600 specialized tablets have been made available to the New Hampshire prison population, at no cost to the state. 
The tablets can be used to make phone calls and send messages, paid for by the sender. The calls are run through the company’s inmate call management system and follow the same rules and procedures as calls from the traditional wall-mounted phones. 
“They just have a little bit more access to be able to call friends and family,” said Brian Peters, vice president of facility product management education at Global Tel*Link, the Virginia-based company that provides the tablet service.
There is a feature that makes it easy to schedule calls, too, where friends and family can send the inmate a “request to call” with a specific time of day listed.
The messaging service includes the ability for friends and family to send approved images and 30-second video clips.
“We see a lot of birthday parties, we see a lot of birth announcements, we see a lot of families singing happy birthday,” Peters said.
For security purposes, inmates cannot use the tablets to make video calls. And while prisoners can’t use the tablets to access the internet freely, there are a number of other services, most of them free to use.
The tablets can interface with prison services to make commissary orders, file electronic requests and grievances and receive important documents. 
Peters said there is access to a law library and educational programs through Khan Academy, where they can learn “anything from basic algebra to string theory.”
The tablets can also be used for some recreation, like listening to FM radio, streaming music or basic games.
“Anyone in prison will tell you the worst part of prison is the boredom,” Peters said. “Boredom causes a certain amount of issues with inmates, causing trouble; there’s a certain amount of mental atrophy that takes place.”
The eight-inch tablets are sturdy, built with a clear casing and a rubber shell. Peters said it’s military drop tested. And it’s assembled using security screws to prevent tampering. The operating system is a proprietary Android interface designed specifically for the corrections environment. 
“It reminds me of the durability and reduced functionality, to some degree, of a child’s tablet,” Peters said.
New Hampshire’s deal with Global Tel*Link is a bit different than the setups that other states have, Peters said. 
While other corrections departments opt for the shared tablet program or the purchase option program, New Hampshire is the only one to opt for both, he said.
Inmates can either share a tablet or pay about $150 to own their own. There’s also an option to buy a cheaper MP3 music player. 





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu