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Jan 21, 2018







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Tea and Food Pairing

When: Thursday, Feb. 23, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 
Where: The Cozy Tea Cart, 104A Route 13, Brookline
Cost: $25 per person. Space is limited. Call to register by Tues., Feb. 21. 
Contact: 249-9111, thecozyteacart.com




Tea eats
Pairing highlights tea as a main ingredient in food dishes

02/16/17
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



Mixing tea with green beans or rice may sound like a strange union, but you can give those and other tea-infused dishes a try during the tea and food pairing happening Thursday, Feb. 23, at The Cozy Tea Cart in Brookline. 

Cozy Tea Cart owner and Tea Specialist Danielle Beaudette will partner with Pampered Chef consultant Diane Grzyb of Brookline to prepare a five-course meal, which they will serve to attendees after demonstrating with Pampered Chef kitchen tools how to cook with tea. 
“It’s like a new ingredient for people that they wouldn’t think to use, but when they do, they love cooking with it,” Beaudette said. 
The meal will feature a salad with a tea vinaigrette, made from Glenburn Autumn Crescendo tea and Organic Camellia Tea Seed Oil; rice infused with Organic Ceylon Highland Green Tea; green beans with garlic and Keemun Black Tea; chicken with a tea spice rub made from Ceylon Breakfast Tea and Organic Camellia Tea Seed Oil; and a spiced apple cake baked with Cozy Tea Cart Spice Tea and topped with salted caramel sauce. 
Beaudette will begin the pairing with some basic facts about tea, followed by a discussion of the teas featured in the meal, their origins and why they were paired with their respective dishes. Prior to eating, guests will also have the chance to sample each tea outside of the dish.  
“I want people to taste the tea on its own first — you can’t always tell what it tastes like when it’s in the food — and then see how it tastes when it’s cooked,” she said. “That way it might also introduce people to teas they’ve never tried before.” 
During the cooking demonstration, attendees will learn techniques for cooking with tea as a main ingredient and different ways to incorporate tea into food, such as infusing the dish by substituting tea for another liquid in the recipe and cooking or baking it right into the dish; adding tea directly to a prepared dish like a salad or soup; and using tea where herbs or spices would be typically be used to enhance the flavor of a dish. 
Beaudette said cooking with tea is a great way to glean the nutrients, vitamins and antioxidants it provides, especially for people who don’t like hot drinks or the taste of tea.
“With some of the dishes and teas, the flavor of the tea won’t be as pronounced. … Black tea, for example, you will taste a lot more than green tea, which you won’t really taste unless it’s a flavored one like a pomegranate green tea,” she said. “Whatever the flavor of the tea is, it contributes to the health benefits, which is the main purpose.” 
Handouts with simple recipes and tips for cooking with tea will be available for attendees to take home, but Beaudette said she hopes people will continue to do their own research and experiment with ways to integrate tea into their regular diet. 
“This is just the beginning,” she said. “You can go online and find all kinds of recipes, but also think outside the box for yourself and just start trying it with different foods.”  





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