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Jan 22, 2018







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Telefon Tel Aviv, Fahrenheit Fair Enough (Ghostly International Records)




Mark Sultan, Mark Sultan (In the Red Records)

Every gang of rock-band hanger-on heathens has one loose cannon who could be this guy, a one-man demolition crew blessed with a boisterous voice made for belting out locker-room sentiments, a talent so pure that it never reaches its real earnings potential only because it was already perfectly filthy from birth. This Montreal garage fixture has collaborated with Black Lips, released albums on seminal imprints like Bonk, Vice and Fat Possum and has gone by about 90 different names, including BBQ, all of which spells a rare form of bohemian ADD which, doctors warn, may result in waking up in dumpsters, not that that isn’t chic. I know: What does all this mean, what does this sound like? Well, a one-man New York Dolls mayhaps, or a subway busker nailing early Rolling Stones, you know, the perfect organism: boneheaded guitar, a tambourine bouncing from somewhere or other, and the slightly strangled bleatings of a maniac in need of a sandwich. Rawer than an albino’s sunburn, Sultan pushes his awful, wonderful slop in our direction, daring us to dip a finger and taste-test it. You should. A+ — Eric W. Saeger




Telefon Tel Aviv, Fahrenheit Fair Enough (Ghostly International Records)
CD Reviews: December 15, 2016

12/15/16
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Telefon Tel Aviv, Fahrenheit Fair Enough (Ghostly International Records)

Reissue of the New Orleans techno duo’s 2001 debut LP, which was one of many attempts during that period to  blend hip-hop, soul and techno. Later, the pair drew more and more of their style from R&B, thus this is a standalone of sorts, experimentalism with no established set of guidelines. “Reak What” begins these proceedings on a Warp Records tip, robotic synth micro-bursts tinkling over faraway unintelligible soul singing, essentially Wall-E makeout music, at least of a sort that’d be imagined by Aphex Twin, one of the guys’ influences. The title track takes things a lot further, tabling a melodically pretty IDM idea, adding grandfather-clock-style clicking to it and piling on the glitch, quite a bit like early drum and bass when you get down to it. “Ttv” is more lush, reminiscent of Higher Intelligence Agency’s more complicated effusions, or Tangerine Dream’s lighter moments, take your pick. With the passing of one of the principals, Charles Cooper, in 2009, this stands as a reminder of one path that was explored and, unfortunately, underappreciated.





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