The Hippo

HOME| ADVERTISING| CONTACT US|

 
Nov 16, 2018







NEWS & FEATURES

POLITICAL

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS

MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

POP CULTURE



BEST OF
CLASSIFIEDS
ADVERTISING
CONTACT US
PAST ISSUES
ABOUT US
MOBILE UPDATES
LIST MY CALENDAR ITEM


Russell’s Organic Blueberries in Contoocook. Courtesy photo.




Blueberry or raspberry pie

Courtesy of Peter Russell of Russell’s Organic Blueberries
 
Pillsbury pie crust or something comparable
4 cups freshly picked blueberries or raspberries
½ cup sugar
¼ cup flour
A pinch of salt
A pinch of nutmeg
Two eggs
 
Follow the baking instructions listed on the pie crust box. 
 
Where to pick your own berries
Information is subject to change as the crops are dependent on the weather. Always confirm availability by calling the farm or checking the farm’s website.
 
• Russell’s Certified Organic (289 Maple St., Contoocook, 344-6913, russellcertifiedorganic.com or find them on Facebook) PYO blueberries are $4 per pint, and raspberries are $7 per pint. Picking hours are generally 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., but check their Facebook page for updates.  
• Brookdale Farm (41 Broad St., Hollis, 465-2240, brookdalefruitfarm.com or find them on Facebook) PYO blueberries are $3 per pound and raspberries are $5 per pint. Picking hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
• Dimond Hill Farm (314 Hopkinton Road, Concord, 496-8218, dimondhillfarm.com or facebook.com/dimondhillfarm) PYO blueberries are expected to open toward the end of July. Picking hours will be daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
• Durocher Farm (157 Charles Bancroft Hwy., Litchfield, 493-4804, pickyourownberries.com or facebook.com/pickyourownberries) PYO blueberries are expected to open this week. Picking hours will be daily from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call or check Facebook page for updated information.
• Lull Farm (65 Broad St., Hollis, 465-7079, livefreeandfarm.com or facebook.com/LullFarmLLC) PYO blueberries expected to open in mid to late July. Picking hours will be daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call or check Facebook page for updated information.
• Sunnycrest Farm (59 High Range Road, Londonderry, 432-7753, sunnycrestfarmnh.com or find them on Facebook) This is the last weekend for PYO strawberries, which are $2.89 per pound and available daily from 7 a.m. to noon. PYO blueberries and raspberries (prices TBD) and cherries, which are $4.50 per pound, are available Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, from 7 a.m. to noon.
• Rossview Farm (85 District 5 Road, Concord, 228-4872, rossviewfarm.com or find them on Facebook) PYO strawberries may still be available and are $2.65 per pound. Check their Facebook page or call to hear a recording of the week’s picking hours.
• Devriendt Farm (178 S. Mast St., Goffstown, 497-2793, devriendtfarm.com or find them on Facebook) PYO strawberries may still be available and are $2.29 per pound. Picking hours are daily from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., weather permitting.
• Hackleboro Orchards (61 Orchard Road, Canterbury, 783-4248, facebook.com/hackleboro.orchards) PYO strawberries may still be available and are $3.20 per pound. Picking hours are daily from dawn to dusk.
• Apple Hill Farm (580 Mountain Road, Concord, 224-8862, applehillfarmnh.com or find them on Facebook) PYO strawberries may still be available and are $2.80 per pound. Picking hours are Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. Fields are located at 89 Hoit Road. 




The perfect pick
Where to go for July berries and how to pick like a pro

07/07/16
By Angie Sykeny asykeny@hippopress.com



 As many farms bring their strawberry picking to a close this week, others are getting started with blueberries and raspberries. While you could purchase a pint of berries at the farm stand, picking your own provides an entirely different way to experience the fruits.

“The experience is not just about picking berries,” said Peter Russell, owner of Russell’s Organic Blueberries farm in Contoocook. “The experience is to be at the farm with the peace and quiet and positive energy. In my case, the blueberries are just a byproduct of that positive experience.”
Russell said that this year, his blueberries are ready for picking starting the first week of July and are expected to stick around for a minimum of six weeks. He also grows raspberries, which will follow a bit later in the month and usually have a shorter season of about three weeks.
“People just die for raspberries,” he said. “There aren’t many of us certified organic farms that sell blueberries and raspberries in particular, so we have people who come up from Boston, from Vermont, all over.”
If there are first-time pickers at his farm, Russell accompanies them to the fields to show them what to look for and how to find the best berries, as well as techniques for quick and easy picking. The best way to do it, he said, is to lightly pinch the fruit and roll it off the stem with your thumb. Once you’ve mastered that, you can try picking with both hands for maximum efficiency. It usually takes the average picker about 20 minutes to pick a couple of pints, he said.
The fruit at certified organic farms such as Russell’s isn’t exposed to pesticides or herbicides, so there’s no harm in eating some straight from the bush.
“I think that’s important when you’re looking for a place to pick your own,” Russell said. “You want to go somewhere you can feel comfortable taking your children, where [the farm] doesn’t spray with things that could make you sick.”
Berries will stay fresh in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Alternatively, you can preserve your berries to enjoy at a later date by freezing them. Simply place them on a cookie sheet, stick them in the freezer until they’re hard, then transport them to a bag and keep them frozen.
“So when it’s wintertime you can just take them out and they’re like a marble,” Russell said. “There are some people who come and pick 300 pints so they can freeze them and have blueberries every day all year.”
Picking your own berries can be a great summertime activity for kids and families and an opportunity for people of all ages to reconnect with nature and become more aware of where their food comes from.
“Children in today’s environment don’t get to experience the outdoors as much,” Russell said. “There’s even adults who come here and say, ‘Wow, I didn’t know these [berries] grew on bushes,’ so I think for people to get more of that outdoor experience and learn how things grow is really important.” 
 





®2018 Hippo Press. site by wedu