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Sep 24, 2018







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Thievery Corporation, The Temple of I and I (ESL Records)




Iron Reagan, Crossover Ministry (Relapse Records)

If the last metal-punk crossover thing you heard was a Cro-Mags or Suicidal Tendencies record and it caused you to give up, don’t feel alone. That whole deal was doomed from the start to have a short shelf life, as we’ve talked about here many times before (to reiterate: the punks couldn’t take those bands seriously, but even more fatally, the death metal patrol did take them seriously). So it’s come around again, this time with a more workable aesthetic, and this Richmond, Virginia, band are at the spear’s edge, with this, their third album, showering us with 18 tracks in 30 minutes — that’s got to be enticing math for punks who don’t completely despise metal (cripes, if they’d just asked me in 1989, I would have told them short, deranged outbursts was the way to do it in the first place). This stuff is faster than its granddaddy’s technique, but there’s still a little too much DRI in there for my taste, threatening to wax anthemic at times even with black-metal drumming — don’t get me wrong, it’s cool, but I suppose I was expecting something a bit more chaotic. B — Eric W. Saeger




Thievery Corporation, The Temple of I and I (ESL Records)


03/09/17
By Eric Saeger news@hippopress.com



Thievery Corporation, The Temple of I and I (ESL Records)
This Washington, D.C., collective hasn’t had a lot of hits, but over the past 20-odd years they’ve put on a DIY clinic, putting out all eight of their LPs on their own Eighteenth Street Lounge record label. In spite of their East-Coast-ness, their fetish is for world music, especially bossa nova during their early years, African beats on 2002’s The Richest Man in Babylon, which finally led to a more dub-oriented sound, the game afoot here but writ large. Jamaican sounds have been a huge part of their sound, but for this album’s sessions the band operated out of Port Antonio, generally cited by natives as “the real Jamaica,” an area that’s hard to get to both artistically and logistically. Opening tune “Thief Rockers” is a deep piece, light 1970s synths slowly mobilizing over a trappish beat and punctuated by lazily sung lines that walk a tightrope between progressivism and subversion. Former Miss Jamaica contestant Racquel Jones gets assigned two songs, adding an annoyed slam-poet edge to her rhymes, a contribution that helps to keep the album’s overall vibe smoother than a pina colada in July. A — Eric W. Saeger





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