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Marty Boldin, TEDxAmoskeagMillyard 2015 speaker. Ron Cillizza photo.




TEDxAmoskeagMillyard

Where: Stockbridge Theatre, 5 Pinkerton St., Derry
When: Saturday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Admission: $35
Contact: tedxamoskeagmillyard.com 




Time for a reboot
TEDxAmoskeagMillyard moves to Derry

10/27/16
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



 Need inspiration? TEDxAmoskeagMillyard hits Derry Saturday, Nov. 12 — and this year, you might actually be able to get a ticket.

The event, now in its sixth year, moved from Southern New Hampshire University’s 200-seat auditorium to the Stockbridge’s 881-seat space in order to allow for more audience members; in 2015, it was sold out with a waiting list. 
It’s independently-organized but licensed by TED and will feature a group of locally nominated or nationally known speakers — Kriss Blevens, Amy Cueva, Maribel Duran, Jay Gupta, Barbara Bradley Hagerty, Brett Houle, Adam Fitzgerald, Greg Moore, Suzanne Ketteridge, Jennifer Lague, Amirah Sackett, Carole Soule, Rob Spencer and Greg Tang — plus performers and TED Talks videos. All presentations will fall under the 2016 theme, “Recharge. Reimagine. Reboot.” About half to two thirds of the speakers are usually from southern New Hampshire, the rest from out of state, according to Eric Ratinoff, event lead organizer.
The presenters are chosen via nomination submissions — Ratinoff estimated there are normally between 50 and 75 each year — who range from national figures to local heroes. Organizers look for a diversity of speakers, people of all ages, races, professions, cultural backgrounds and experiences who have important stories to tell. Those chosen then work with coaches to help develop their presentations.
“I noticed after doing this for a couple years that a professor’s first draft sounds a lot like a lecture. A business professional’s sounds a lot like a PowerPoint presentation. Writers tend to write things that sound a bit like short stories. And none of those things is quite right for TEDTalks,” said David Hudson, who’s been a part of the TEDxAmoskeagMillyard speaker team since 2013. “It has the emotional impact of a sermon, the narrative arc, often, of a short story or an essay. It should have the logical flow of an academic piece or presentation. … In my mind, there’s a pretty high bar for a TEDTalk.”
It’s a huge undertaking to put on the volunteer-run event, but Ratinoff said the crew gets re-energized when they see the results.
“We realized it can be an incredibly impactful day. … We can challenge people’s assumptions and get them excited about ideas and give them new ways of seeing things,” Ratinoff said. “Every year this is done … there’s this sense that we made some magic happen. That’s reinforced when people come up to members of the team at the end of the day and say thank you. Some people have said this is a life-altering experience. When you get that kind of feedback, it makes it easier to roll up your sleeves again and get after it the next year.”
For Hudson, memorable presenters include Sy Montgomery, who talked about the intelligence of animals, and Jessica Higgins, whose topic was on PTSD. Other notable speakers from previous years include filmmaker and White House appointee for the Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities Dan Habib; inventor, scientist and clean water advocate Deepika Kurup; and tap dance artist and Riverdance performer Aaron Tolson. The TEDxAmoskeagMillyard 2014 talk by Tania Simoncelli, “Should you be able to patent a human gene?,” was selected by the TED Editorial team to be posted on TED.com.
Seeing it live is much different from watching it on YouTube.
“The energy in the room is phenomenal. You’ve got a room full of people who share your passion for TEDTalks,” Hudson said. 





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