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A piece by Cindy Rizza from a past Minumental exhibition. Courtesy image.




15th Annual Minumental Exhibition & Art Sale

Where: New Hampshire Institute of Art, Emma B. French Gallery, 148 Concord St., Manchester
When: On view March 10 through April 8, reception Friday, March 10, from 5 to 7 p.m., gallery hours Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Admission: Free
Contact: nhia.edu, exhibitions@nhia.edu




Tiny art, big punch
NHIA hosts 15th Minumental show this weekend

03/09/17
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



 The New Hampshire Institute of Art’s 15th Annual Minumental Exhibition and Art Sale is all about access — for both artists and buyers. 

It’s on view at the school’s Emma B. French Gallery March 10 through April 8 and features more than 100 pieces, all sized less than four inches, any dimension, and priced less than $60. NHIA President Kent Devereaux said in an email the idea came from a desire to offer the public a way to purchase top-quality artwork at an affordable price.
“The tongue-in-cheek name of the show refers to the often monumental size of much contemporary work, and the recognition that most of us don’t have living rooms even big enough to display such work, let alone afford the New York gallery prices,” Devereaux said in the email. 
Everything on display in this exhibition is by NHIA students, plus faculty, staff and members of the institute. All media are typically represented, including paintings, photography, jewelry, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture and mixed media.
“They’re all mixed together. The president’s work could be right next to a freshman’s work, and right next to that is a department chair’s work. It’s exciting and cool to see everyone on the same level,” said Emily Masterson, an NHIA staff member, who, at the time of her phone interview, was still uncertain what she’d be submitting before the March 8 deadline. 
She thinks the show is especially beneficial for new artists.
“Freshmen are sometimes nervous or scared to submit anything, but when you take the pressure off, and it’s only a two-by-two or four-by-four piece, it’s something they can handle,” said Masterson, whose home is filled with work from past Minumental exhibitions. “It’s an easy step into exhibiting your work.”
Sure, it’s rewarding for students when you buy their work, but it works the other way too.
“I feel really flattered when a student buys something I submitted,” Masterson said. 
Karen Mayeu, the design chair, was also planning on submitting Minumental artwork and shopping for new pieces at the opening. She likes that they’re small enough to fit anywhere and inexpensive enough that you can buy multiples, with some prices as low as $5 to $10. Artists are often more willing to take a chance and create more experimental art for this kind of show.
“Some people enter the show using studies for larger pieces. Some people go out and try new things. Sometimes, it’s exactly what they’re working on,” Mayeu said via phone. “Some of the work can stand on its own, but because of their size, people tend to buy two or three and then put them together.” 





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