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Fresh tomato sauce

Makes about 2 jars, adapted from Wellness Mama blog
 
5 pounds fresh tomatoes
¼ cup olive oil
1 large onion, diced
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1/3 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
1 sprig fresh thyme (or ½ teaspoon dried)
1 sprig fresh oregano (or 1 teaspoon dried)
2 bay leaves
2 sprigs of parsley (or 1 teaspoon dried)
1 teaspoon red pepper (optional)
1 teaspoon salt
1 carrot (half grated and half whole)
1 tablespoon honey
 
Begin by blanching tomatoes for 1 minute in boiling water. Immediately transfer to ice bath and remove skins and stems. Set aside.
Add olive oil, garlic, onions and grated carrots to large pot over medium heat, stirring continuously until aromatic and onions are tender. Add tomatoes, all the herbs and spices and sea salt. Simmer on low for 2 to 3 hours. Stir occasionally and break up any large pieces of tomatoes with spoon. 
Add half the carrot and honey for last 30 minutes, helps with acidity.
Remove the sprigs and carrot from the sauce. Serve or store your sauce and enjoy! Just this week, I used mine for lasagna, pizza and spaghetti. 




Tomatoes and herbs
Perishables

09/25/14
By Allison Willson Dudas



 My garden is still producing tomatoes, and I am one happy farmer. The rest of my harvest is winding down, and though I’ve planted some winter squash and greens, my growing season is just about over. Fall is upon us and I can sure feel it in the air! I’m grateful for this one last gift of summer — late-blooming tomatoes.

What is one to do with all these tomatoes? Make sauce, of course! I’d been stressing out about making my own tomato sauce because every recipe I’ve found takes about 3 hours. Who has that kind of time? But, what I didn’t realize is that the sauce slowly simmering over a stove takes up the bulk of the time — as in, I didn’t have to do anything but check on it every once in a while and maybe give it a little stir. It was really quite easy, and my anxiety proved to be completely unfounded. 
I’d read a lot about what kind of tomatoes make the best sauce and, since I did my reading after I planted my tomatoes, I ended up with none of them! Apparently, plum tomatoes are the tops. Beefsteak tomatoes, because of their watery insides, are supposedly the worst.  I used whatever was ripe and my sauce turned out wonderfully. From Defiant to Beefsteak to God-knows-what-else because my toddler ripped up my garden label, the sauce was delicious. 
Not only did I get to use the last tomatoes, but I dipped into my herb garden as well. Rather than using dried oregano, basil or parsley, I just sauntered out into my garden and picked some sprigs myself. It was very satisfying to have so many fresh ingredients go into my sauce, and I was delighted to reap the benefits of my harvest with such a versatile tomato sauce. 
— Allison Willson Dudas 
 
As seen in the September 25, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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