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Treasure Hunt: July 10, 2014


07/10/14
By Donna Welch



 Dear Donna,


I read your column all the time in the Hippo and visited your website recently and thought I would take a moment to let you know that you should tell readers not only about antiques and their values but how you do re-purposing as well.
I found the story of the bin from Pennsylvania on your site. It is inspiring to us who never look at things to reuse.
 
Karen
 
Dear Karen,
Today I am going to share the story you refer to so maybe everyone will find something within their own home to repurpose.  
Re-purposing is when you can find discarded antiques and turn them into valuable ones again with just a little creativity and work.
I travel all over New England looking for antiques, and while I am on the road I often find items that used to have purpose but are no longer needed and just put aside. Some times these pieces can be made useful again and can be used within your home.
This piece was found in Pennsylvania (one of my favorite shopping places) and was used for grain in the mid 1800s. No longer needed, it ended up on a porch of an antiques shop. Because of the size (9 feet by 2 feet by 2 feet) there really was a limited market for it. Too big for storage, too big as a coffee table, etc. 
Because it was old enough to be in a red original paint and in good structural condition, to me it still had to have a purpose. So I purchased it and brought it back to New Hampshire. Lucky for me we have a 12-foot trailer for just this reason.
We (my husband and I) took the piece and cut old beams from a barn to bring the piece up to table height. Then I ordered glass from a local glass shop. I filled the inside with dried bread and baskets, rolling pins, etc., mixed it with a collection of odd antique chairs and put it out for display. 
Within a week the old piece from Pennsylvania found a new home in New Hampshire. It isn’t used for what it was made for anymore but is now loved as a dining room table. This grain bin that had minimal antique value left now has a new decorative, unique and useful value to it.
 
Donna Welch has spent more than 20 years in the antiques and collectibles field and owns From Out Of The Woods Antique Center in Goffstown (fromoutofthewoodsantiques.com). She is an antiques appraiser and instructor. To find out about your antique or collectible, send a clear photo of the object and information about it to Donna Welch, From Out Of The Woods Antique Center, 465 Mast Road, Goffstown, N.H., 03045. Or email her at footwdw@aol.com or drop by the shop (call first, 624-8668). 
 
As seen in the July 10, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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