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Courtesy photo.




Singin’ in the Rain

Where: Edmund Keefe Auditorium, 117 Elm St., Nashua
When: Friday, May 12, at 8 p.m.; Saturday, May 13, at 8 p.m.; Sunday, May 14, at 2 p.m.
Admission: $18 to $20
Contact: actorsingers.org




True love
Nashua Actorsingers cast all aside for Singin’ in the Rain

05/11/17
By Kelly Sennott ksennott@hippopress.com



 Passion goes a long way for the Nashua Actorsingers, whose cast and crew dealt with leg injuries, half marathons and cancer to present Singin’ in the Rain this weekend at the Janice B. Streeter Theater. 

“When they approached me to be in the show, initially I thought, oh, I don’t know. I was trying to get healthy,” said Seraphim D’Andrea, who plays Lina Lamont and recently finished chemotherapy for breast cancer. “But being in a show feeds your soul. You can get kind of lost being sick. But I’ve been a performer since I was 5, and I was missing that. So I said, OK, I need something to kind of make me have a purpose. To fight through, you need that.”
Singin’ in the Rain is a musical based on the 1952 film starring Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor and Debbie Reynolds, with book by Adolph Green and Betty Comden, music by Nacio Herb Brown and lyrics by Arthur Freed. It was first produced on London’s West End stage in 1983 and is set in the 1920s during  Hollywood’s waning days of the silent screen era.
The show presents many technical challenges, from onstage rain to movie projections, and rehearsals have been noisy and full of activity, said the show’s director, Kathy Lovering, during a recent rehearsal at the Actorsingers Studio. That night, cast members were glammed up for press photoshoots, and tap shoes could be heard throughout the building.
But Singin’ in the Rain is known for its tunes and iconic dance numbers, so dancers had to work extra hard when the show’s choreographer, Lara Hyde, suffered a leg injury a month into rehearsals. They had to learn the steps with her in a chair, leg propped up, but they powered through using some of the choreography videos she proactively filmed before rehearsals even began. 
“Losing Lara was really hard, but we all kind of rallied behind each other and supported each other any way we could,” said Samantha Kowalski, who that day was feeling the effects of running her first-ever half marathon the weekend before.
The eldest dancer of the group is Alice Pascucci, who vowed to be tapping onstage by her 80th birthday, but Lovering said both cast and crew include multiple people over 80, plus a couple of teens. 
All are performing not for money, but for the love of what they’re doing.
“When you do community theater, the community is just as important as the theater. You come here and you have a good time. This is a lot of work; I work full time, and I’m getting old, but you come here after a long day, and it’s fun,” she said. 





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