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Nature enthusiasts pound an ash log for basket-making materials at last year’s Harvest Moon Festival. Courtesy photo.




Harvest Moon & NatureFest

Where: 18 Highlawn Road, Warner
When: Sunday, Sept. 28, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: $8.50 for adults, $7.50 for seniors & students, $6.50 for children ages 6 through 12, and a maximum family cost of $26. Members of the museum receive free admission.
Visit: indianmuseum.org
Call: 456-2600




Two museums, one festival
Celebrating the harvest

09/25/14



 Originally two separate events, the Harvest Moon Festival and the Nature Festival are coming together as one giant celebration on Sunday, Sept. 28.

Hosted by the Mount Kearsarge Indian Museum and the Little Nature Museum, the Harvest Moon & NatureFest is a celebration of the harvest season and Little Nature Museum’s grand re-opening.
“The Little Nature Museum will now be located in the barn at the museum and [is] opening its doors for the first time,” said Lynn Clark, executive director of the Mount Kearsarge Indian Museum. 
Several themed demonstrations will be taking place throughout the day, including demonstrations on how to create a dugout canoe and how to tan a deer skin hide. The demonstrators, said Clark, are native people who have been involved with the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum for years.
Hands-on activities will celebrate activities of the native culture as well, including beadworking, cooking, and pounding on ash logs to get ash splints for basket-making.
This year, the Little Nature Museum is bringing back The Wildlife Encounters show, which, said Sandra Martin, the director of the Little Nature Museum, is as much entertaining as it is a warning against why we shouldn’t have wild pets.
“It’s always a surprise, what they’ve been bringing,” said Martin. “[In years past] they’ve brought the big boa constrictor snakes [and] a young bobcat. Tortoises are always good because the kids can go up and pet those.”
The “raptor rapture” program hosted by the New Hampshire Audubon Society will make an appearance; in conjunction with migration season, the Audubon will present live demonstrations about raptors such as owls, falcons and hawks.
Several types of vegetables will be ready for participants to harvest in the garden, including corn, beans and squash, also known by the Native Americans as the “three sisters.” Clark said that, new this year, people will be able to pound corn to make corn meal and then make corn bread.
Activities like dancing, storytelling and crafts will add more native flavor to the event.
“This is a chance for people to see that the native culture is still alive,” said Clark. “The demonstrations harken back to another era, show off what [the native people] do, and you can interact with those who are still carrying on with these traditional crafts. What we learned from the native cultures — they emphasized our relationship with the environment.”
Martin said she hopes the combined event will help kick off a fruitful relationship between the two museums.
“Hopefully the people [who attended the Little Nature Museum’s event] before the move will return to see everything in a new way, and we hope to get some new visitors as well,” she said. 
 
As seen in the September 25, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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