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Nov 20, 2018







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Order your Thanksgiving pie and give back to the Food Bank. Photo courtesy Black Forest Cafe.




Win your Thanksgiving order 

Place your Thanksgiving order by Sunday, Nov. 23. Winning raffle ticket will be drawn on Monday, Nov. 24. If the Black Forest Cafe (212 Route 101, Amherst) meets its fundraising goal of $1,000, customers can redeem losing ticket stubs in January for a free slice of pie. Call 672-0500 or visit blackforestcafe.com.
Give to the New Hampshire Food Bank
Visit nhfoodbank.org to donate online or call 669-9725.




Win turkey dinner, or pie
Black Forest Cafe creates fundraiser for NH Food Bank

11/06/14



What’s better than free pie? Free pie that gives back. Black Forest Cafe co-owner Martha Walters has created a new fundraiser that will help the New Hampshire Food Bank and give customers a chance to win free food.

“You know how Jordan’s Furniture does [a fundraiser] with the Red Sox? We sort of tweaked that with the Thanksgiving orders,” Walters said during a phone interview. 
When customers place their Thanksgiving food and bakery orders, they can also purchase a raffle ticket for $5. The winning ticket will be drawn on Monday, Nov. 24, and the winner receives his entire Thanksgiving pre-order for free. Don’t throw away your ticket stub, though — if the Black Forest Cafe meets its fundraising goal of $1,000 for the New Hampshire Food Bank, then you can trade those “losing” tickets in for a free slice of pie in January. 
“So everyone’s a winner,” Walters said.
All the proceeds from the ticket sales will go directly to the New Hampshire Food Bank. 
“It’s very exciting because it just meshes so well with what we do. I’m already beginning to think we can do this every year.”
It’s not the first time the restaurant has worked with the food bank. Last month, Black Forest Cafe participated in the Food Bank’s Grow Local, Eat Local tasting event.
“A lot of businesses have made [giving back] fun and inclusive of their staff,” Mel Gosselin of the New Hampshire Food Bank said. “People are thinking outside of what they have for resources to support the food bank.”
A recent national hunger study, Gosselin said, shows the need, especially in how childhood hunger and overall hunger issues are growing. The New Hampshire Food Bank’s greatest need right now is for protein (see related story on page 6). It had previously received much of its protein from grocery partners, but now its protein recovery is down 52 percent, Gosselin said, after Stop & Shop closed its stores in New Hampshire and Shaw’s supermarkets locations closed and ended store-level meat recovery.
“Our biggest stressor right now is meeting demand. What we do is we have a wish list of the 400 programs we support with wish list needs for the holiday,” she said. “At this point, funds to support that protein purchase is the biggest resource that we could ask for.”
Holiday orders at the Black Forest Cafe are very popular, Walters said, so it only made sense to integrate a way to give back.
“I think people are feeling generous,” she said. “They want to [give back], but you’ve got to make it easy for them. … It’s a good reminder you have to make your holiday order anyway.”
Apple pie and pumpkin pie are the most popular orders for Thanksgiving at Black Forest Cafe, Walters said (last year there was a tie for the number of orders for the two pies, she said). The holiday cookies are also popular, as well as other pie varieties like cran apple and pecan. 
“I find people go very, very traditional for Thanksgiving,” Walters said. “We started adding side dishes, so we have gravy, we have a nice cranberry orange sauce, so people who are putting dinner together, they can grab one item they don’t want to make.”
There’s a full Thanksgiving dinner package with stuffed boneless turkey breast with gravy, which Walters said is perfect for couples, small families, “or even a single person that doesn’t want to be left out.”
“The reason we do what we do for Thanksgiving is because we want to be closed for the holiday,” Walters said. “That’s why we do this big takeout day, so everybody on our staff and ourselves can have a family day.” 
 
As seen in the November 6, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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