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The sheep at Spinner Farm in Deering will be ready for petting on the Wool Arts Tour. Courtesy photo.




Wool Arts Tour

Where: Spring Pond Farm, 81 Muzzy Hill Road, Greenfield
Spinner Farm, 192 Old County Road, Deering
Western View Farm, 374 Gleason Falls Road, Hillsboro
The Fiber Studio, 161 Foster Hill Road, Henniker
When: Saturday, Oct. 11, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: Free
Call: 464-0232
Contact: lesliec@spinnerfarm.com




Wooly good time
Wool Arts Tours features four farms’ fibers

10/09/14



 Four farms along a scenic rural stretch of Route 202 are opening their doors for the Wool Arts Tour on Saturday, Oct. 11, and Sunday, Oct. 12.

Each farm is offering attendees a chance to get an inside look at how craftsmen create articles of clothing from animal fibers, according to Leslie Chunn, owner of the Spinner Farm in Deering. A variety of demonstrations will be featured, including knitting, spinning, needle-felting and weaving. Some of the craftspeople will use material that comes straight from the animals on the farm.
“It’s an educational and fun opportunity for people in the community to learn more about the fiber arts,” Chunn said. “A lot of us have live animals … so we show people how we process the fiber that is sheared off [the animal] and create finished goods.”
Chunn, who raises sheep and horses, said demonstrations on her farm include how to use a spinning wheel for sheep wool, how to properly dye wool, how to knit together articles of clothing and more.
The other farms offer demonstrations with several other species of fiber-rich animals, including alpacas, angora rabbits, and angora goats. For families interested in a day out in the great outdoors, Chunn said, participants will have a chance to meet some of the animals on the farm up close and personal.
“This is a chance for families to come out from the cities and suburbs to get a look at what farm life is like,” said Chunn. “A lot of people don’t understand where meat or clothing can come from. We encourage kids to try their hands at spinning on a wheel, needle-felting or maybe even just [taking] the opportunity to walk a sheep on a leash or pet a sheep.”
The tour will feature hand-painted sheep signs to guide visitors to each destination on the tour. Because admission is free to all of the sites on both days, participants can choose to stay at just one farm for the day or visit all four, said Chunn.
“Each of us has a little something different to offer,” she said.
The farms will host blacksmiths, wet-felters, knitters and more. The versatility of the fibers, said Deb Cilley, who raises alpacas at Spring Pond Farm, allows for the craftspeople to make a variety of different products that will be available on site.
“We make socks, hats, scarves, mittens, felted animals,” she said. “We’ve made a bunch of sock monkeys — the ones with the big red lips — out of alpaca hair.”
Cilley said Spring Pond Farm will also be offering other attractions like an observation hive, hay rides and train rides around the farm.
The farms will have homemade-type foods available, including hamburgers, hot dogs, pulled pork sandwiches, corn chowder, ice cream and baked goodies.
“My husband and I have rented out a tent and picnic tables where people can sit outside and have lunch,” said Cilley. “And, maybe, watch people walk by with baby alpacas.” 
 
As seen in the October 9, 2014 issue of the Hippo.





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