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Sep 24, 2018







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 How to use zucchini

1. Spiralize it. If you are late to this craze, you need to hop on the bandwagon immediately. Get yourself a spiralizer (they vary in price and you don’t have to spend a lot!) and make some “zoodles.” Zoodles are edible raw as a base for a salad (think macaroni salad with no macaroni) or sautéed slightly in place of traditional spaghetti. In my experience, cooked zoodles work with tomato sauce, pesto and even cream sauce. Particularly if you’re trying to lower your carb intake, zoodles are for you.
2. Mandoline it. With a couple of simple kitchen tools, zucchini becomes an incredible treat. Slice up some zucchini into super-thin circles, place them on parchment paper with a little olive oil on a baking sheet and bake at 350 degrees for about 12 minutes (but watch them closely!). Salt and pepper them and enjoy.
3. Sheet it. The box grater I own has a feature that allows me to slice lengthwise and create a sheet with vegetables like zucchini or eggplant. If you’re super fancy and you own a KitchenAid mixer with a vegetable sheet attachment, do it up! Make sheets however you can with your zucchini (use a knife and cutting board if you have to) and treat it like lasagna. Layer it with ground beef, tomato sauce, ricotta and mozzarella and bake. So good!
4. Grate and save it. Sometimes you just end up with too much zucchini. Not to worry. You can freeze it! My favorite thing is to grate and bag zucchini in the perfect amount for my zucchini bread and chocolate zucchini cake recipes. I’ll label them and use them in the future.
5. Hide it. Grating zucchini makes it so inconspicuous. You can add it to smoothies or even your homemade tomato sauce for a nutritional kick. 




Zucchini


08/22/18



 One of the most incredible parts of having your own garden in New Hampshire is growing zucchini. Zucchini, in my experience, is the easiest vegetable to grow from seed, particularly because of how much it produces. I remember the first year of my garden, when I had no idea what I was doing, my zucchini plants were prolific. While they grew in spite of my lack of skill and complete ignorance, there are certain important rules to follow when growing zucchini.

Zucchini is a kind of squash originally developed in Italy. The name comes from the Italian word “zucchino,” which means “small squash” in Italian (thank you, The Spruce Eats). They grow best in warm weather and should be planted after the risk of frost has passed. While I didn’t do this my first year, zucchini ought to be planted in mounds and thinned to one plant per mound as it grows. The benefit of thinning is to bolster the strongest plant so it becomes a good producer. Zucchini plants do need space, so make sure to leave enough room between mounds, at least two feet. 
Zucchini’s versatility makes it so easy to use. I’ve gotten pretty good at coming up with various ways to eat the incredible amount of zucchini my garden produces every year. Here are my favorite ways to eat zucchini. 
 
— Allison Willson Dudas 





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